Alex Sanders (politician)

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Alex Sanders
Chief Judge of the South Carolina Court of Appeals
In office
1983–1992
President of the College of Charleston
In office
1992–2001
President of the Charleston School of Law
Assumed office
2002
Personal details
Born
Alexander Mullings Sanders, Jr.

(1939-09-29) September 29, 1939 (age 83)
Columbia, South Carolina
SpouseZoe Dutrow Sanders[1]
Alma materUniversity of South Carolina, University of Virginia
Occupationjudge, lawyer, politician, academic administrator

Alexander Mullings Sanders, Jr. (born September 29, 1939) is an American politician from the state of South Carolina. He is the former chief judge of the South Carolina Court of Appeals (1983–1992)[2] and was the 19th President of the College of Charleston (1992–2001). In 2002, he was the Democratic candidate for the U.S. Senate seat left vacant after the retirement of Strom Thurmond. He was defeated by the Republican candidate, U.S. Representative Lindsey Graham.[3][4]

Sanders was born in and grew up in Columbia, South Carolina[5] and attended AC Moore Elementary School, Hand Middle School, and Dreher High School. He received degrees from the University of South Carolina and the University of Virginia. He later taught in the Political Science Department at Harvard University.[6]

As one of five founders, Sanders was the President of the Charleston School of Law from its founding in 2002 until 2013.[7]

Judge Sanders currently teaches courses in the Political Science Department at the College of Charleston.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Alex Sanders". iop.harvard.edu. Harvard Kenndy Institute of Politics.
  2. ^ "Coming of Age: The South Carolina Court of Appeals". South Carolina Court of Appeals. Archived from the original on 26 February 2010. Retrieved 21 January 2010.
  3. ^ "Lindsey O. Graham (R-S.C.)". WhoRunsGov. Archived from the original on 26 March 2010. Retrieved 21 January 2010.
  4. ^ "Election '02 Campaign Spotlight No. 9". U.S. Department of State's Office of International Information Programs. Archived from the original on 27 October 2009. Retrieved 21 January 2010.
  5. ^ Assembly, South Carolina General (28 August 1990). "South Carolina Legislative Manual". General Assembly of South Carolina. – via Google Books.
  6. ^ "Alex Sanders". Harvard University Institute of Politics. Archived from the original on 18 August 2010. Retrieved 21 January 2010.
  7. ^ "J. Edward Bell III, President".
  8. ^ "Department of Political Science - College of Charleston". Retrieved 26 June 2012.
Party political offices
Preceded by
Elliott Close
Democratic nominee for U.S. Senator from South Carolina
(Class 2)

2002
Succeeded by